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Overland Mail Baghdad Haifa Pages
 

Correspondence between Iraq Post Office and British Post

   

By Air Mail.

No. 8.21/22.

From:

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS.

BAGHDAD. dated the 16th May 1923.

 

To:

The Secretary,

General Post Office,

London.

 

Sir,

 

I have the honour to say the establishment of a special weekly mail service by Motor Transport between Baghdad -Haifa is under contemplation. The period of transit between the two places to be not more than 60 hours. The Mails would circulate from Haifa via Port said the transit being 13 hours.

In the event of a satisfactory arrangement being concluded the transit period between Baghdad and London would be about 10 days.

It is therefore suggested that perhaps your Administration as well as other foreign countries, through the intermediary of your Post Offices may desire to use this accelerated services for mail to Iraq.

The conditions under which the services be used will be briefly as follows:-

(1) All classes of un-insured correspondences restored as well as unregistered except parcels may be transmitted via. Haifa in closed mail bags or packets. Liability for registered articles between Haifa - Baghdad will not be accepted.

(2) The charge for transit of mails by this special Motor Service will be RS.3/- per lb. of the total gross weight including the weight of packing.

This administration proposes to levy a surtax of annas 3 per 20 grs. or fraction of that weight in addition to the

 

The ordinary postage for articles transmitted from Iraq by this service.

It may be pointed out that if the service is established it no doubt will considerably reduce the weight of mails carried by the Baghdad - Cairo Air Service for not only will the transit period be approximately to same but the sur-tax will be 50% less.

I would therefore ask you to be good enough to let me know whether your Administration will utilise this service and the approximate weight of mails that may be expected.

The date of introduction of this service will be intimated later.

 

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

your most obedient Servant,

(Sgd.) Douglas W. Gunbley.

INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS


BY AIR MAIL

‘IRAQ

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL

POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS

 

 

No. S.21/22, Baghdad, dated the 12th JULY 1923

 

To

The Secretary

General Post Office, LONDON.

 

Sir,

With reference to your letter No. 157326/23 dated 26th June 1923, I have the honour to say that it is not the intention of this Postal Administration to make special conveyance charges for mail or impose special additional rate on letters outside the ordinary postal union rates, when such mails are conveyed by ordinary services already maintained.

It was thought that a postal administration was permitted to make arrangement for the improvement of postal relations within mutual consent of interested administrations and therefore is it proposed to establish this service as an extraordinary service (of which) transit rates being governed by article 4 para 6 of the Convent of Madrid.

 

The Postmaster General will no doubt readily understand that the proposed service is purely experimental and intended as present as an extraordinary service similar to that of the Baghdad Cairo Air Service.

This desert service will require a special type of Mechanical Transport and considerable organisation will be necessary in view of the fact that the route is 700 miles long over most of which there is no road. For nearly five hundred miles the run is over a trackless and waterless desert which is absolutely inhabited, from which you will realise that a very elaborate organisation is necessary in order to avoid loss of life in the event of the breakdown of a Car.

No contractor would undertake the service at ordinary postal union transit rates nor is this Administration in a position to finance a service that entails excessive special expense, without charging a special transit charge.

It may be mentioned that although part of the mails from Iraq would travel by this desert route, yet the Iraq Post would also paying the transit charges to India and your administration for these same mails by the ordinary Basrah – Bombay route. Therefore no portion of the ordinary postage obtained by the Iraq Post Office could be taken towards the transit charges for this service.

The rate of Rs. 3/- per lb for this service does not appear unreasonably excessive. It would not only  be half of that levied on mails transmitted by the Baghdad-Cairo Air Service but it is expected to be quicker than the Air Service as now conducted and give a weekly service instead of a fortnightly one.

Until this administration has gained more experience of the actual running of the service, it is regretted that no responsibility of registered articles by this route can be accepted nor can it be stated weather all the mails fro and from this Administration and Persia could be transmitted by it. It is proposed initially to restrict the service to letter mails only.

The Route will pass through the following places in Iraq, Syria and Palestine – Baghdad – Ramadi – Wadi Hauran at Tutba – Talata Sai – Damascus – Haifa by Motor, Haifa – Port Saud by rail and onward by P & O Steamers as usual.

It is  thought that a contract for the carriage of the whole of the Iraq mail from Baghdad to Haifa by Motor could be made  for between £ 750 and £ 1000 per mensem (NOTE: monthly payment, monthly per diem payment) and although we realize the desirability of dealing with the whole of the mail by the quickest route the Postmaster General will no doubt realise that this administration has not the financial strength necessary to arrange this at ordinary and unremunerative rates. Should the Postmaster General however consider that Imperial interests are sufficient to warrant his administration making such a contract we should be glad to pay the ordinary union postal transit charges and not charge any higher rates for articles posted in Iraq.

 

As early a notification as possible will be given of the introduction of the service.

 

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant

(signed) Douglas Whumbley

INSPECTOR GENERAL OF POSTS AND TELS.

 


 

‘IRAQ

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL

POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS

OVERLAND MAIL BAGHDAD-HAIFA

 

No. S.21/22, Baghdad, dated the 30th August 1923

 

To

The Secretary

General Post Office,

LONDON.

 

 

Sir,

 

In inviting a reference to my letter No. S.21/22 dated 30th August 1923, I would be obliged if you would arrange to cable the date of receipt of the mails sent Overland via Haifa from Baghdad on 30th August 1923.

 

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant

(signed) Signature (unreadable)

DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL OF POSTS.